Do carb cutters really keep weight off? A big new diet study, explains

(By VOX)

A new study, led by researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital, appears in the BMJ and is arguably one of the most rigorous diet studies ever done on the question of carbs and weight maintenance. But don’t think it’ll end the question about diets. Getty Images/EyeEm

It’s probably the most contentious question in the dieting wars: How much do carbs really matter when it comes to weight loss?

On one side are a cadre of respected researchers; the journalist Gary Taubes; and Atkins, Zone, and keto diet devotees who passionately argue that if we could just pry ourselves away from the pasta, bagels, and cookies, our weight struggles would be over.

On the other side are equally reputable researchers and nutritionists who haven’t bought into the low-carb claims. They instead argue that most studies show low-carb diets aren’t better than any other diet when it comes to keeping weight off.

It’s a rich and lively debate. And on Thursday morning, Dr. Oz jumped into the fray, appearing on the Today show to highlight a new study showing that cutting carbs can help people “lose weight, not feel discomfort while doing it, and sustain it,” he said.

The study, led by researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital, appears in the journal BMJ and is arguably one of the most rigorous diet studies ever done. While it didn’t show exactly what Dr. Oz suggested, it is an important bit of evidence in this debate — and yet another reminder of the incredible difficulty of proving anything when it comes to nutrition.

For the study, which cost $12 million to complete, researchers wanted to look at whether maintaining weight loss over 20 weeks would be easier on a low-carb, moderate-carb, or high-carb diet. 

Read the full article at Vox.com

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